Urgent: Protected Wild Horses at Risk of Slaughter!

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Urgent: Protected Wild Horses at Risk of Slaughter!

Update—January 29, 2019: The petition period has now closed. We want to thank the over 40,000 wild horse supporters who spoke up to ask the USFS to abandon its plan to sell wild horses from the Devil’s Garden herd without limitation. 

The U.S. Forest Service has announced plans that will allow wild horses to be sent to slaughterhouses across our borders. Approximately 1,000 horses from the iconic Devil’s Garden herd in Northern California have been rounded up and will be given just 60 days to be adopted before they’re sold off to the highest bidder. The sales contracts will have no limits on how these once-wild horses are treated, letting kill buyers (individuals who sell horses to slaughter for human consumption) buy horses for $1 apiece, then sell them to slaughter across our borders to make a profit.

California has had a ban in place on the sale of horses for slaughter for decades, and California’s Attorney General and its two U.S. senators have all spoken out against the Forest Service’s plan, but the agency is pushing ahead.

Even worse: there is no end in sight. The Forest Service plans to continue these roundups and removals each year—with no plan for many unadopted horses other than to end up on foreign dinner plates. Whatever happens now will likely become the ongoing management strategy not just for these horses, but for all those removed from National Forest land in the future.

Update—January 29, 2019: The petition period has now closed. We want to thank the over 40,000 wild horse supporters who spoke up to ask the USFS to abandon its plan to sell wild horses from the Devil’s Garden herd without limitation. 

The U.S. Forest Service has announced plans that will allow wild horses to be sent to slaughterhouses across our borders. Approximately 1,000 horses from the iconic Devil’s Garden herd in Northern California have been rounded up and will be given just 60 days to be adopted before they’re sold off to the highest bidder. The sales contracts will have no limits on how these once-wild horses are treated, letting kill buyers (individuals who sell horses to slaughter for human consumption) buy horses for $1 apiece, then sell them to slaughter across our borders to make a profit.

California has had a ban in place on the sale of horses for slaughter for decades, and California’s Attorney General and its two U.S. senators have all spoken out against the Forest Service’s plan, but the agency is pushing ahead.

Even worse: there is no end in sight. The Forest Service plans to continue these roundups and removals each year—with no plan for many unadopted horses other than to end up on foreign dinner plates. Whatever happens now will likely become the ongoing management strategy not just for these horses, but for all those removed from National Forest land in the future.

 
 

Update—January 29, 2019: The petition period has now closed. We want to thank the over 40,000 wild horse supporters who spoke up to ask the USFS to abandon its plan to sell wild horses from the Devil’s Garden herd without limitation. 

The U.S. Forest Service has announced plans that will allow wild horses to be sent to slaughterhouses across our borders. Approximately 1,000 horses from the iconic Devil’s Garden herd in Northern California have been rounded up and will be given just 60 days to be adopted before they’re sold off to the highest bidder. The sales contracts will have no limits on how these once-wild horses are treated, letting kill buyers (individuals who sell horses to slaughter for human consumption) buy horses for $1 apiece, then sell them to slaughter across our borders to make a profit.

California has had a ban in place on the sale of horses for slaughter for decades, and California’s Attorney General and its two U.S. senators have all spoken out against the Forest Service’s plan, but the agency is pushing ahead.

Even worse: there is no end in sight. The Forest Service plans to continue these roundups and removals each year—with no plan for many unadopted horses other than to end up on foreign dinner plates. Whatever happens now will likely become the ongoing management strategy not just for these horses, but for all those removed from National Forest land in the future.

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