Consumers Deserve the Truth

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Consumers Deserve the Truth

When it comes to the treatment of farm animals, food products boasting “humanely raised” on their labels may be full of hot air.  Consumers expect a real difference in how animals were raised when they buy products packaged with certain buzzwords, but in truth, no one is policing this form of marketing.

Animals can be raised in crowded, unsanitary conditions with no enrichment or outdoor access—and still, the resulting meat, eggs and milk may be sent to your supermarket bearing terms like "humanely raised" or "raised with care." The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) doesn't define these terms or check up on the actual conditions at the farms.

This is bad for both farm animals and consumers who care about their treatment. It’s also not fair to the many responsible producers who work hard to be certified by legitimate programs dedicated to farm animal welfare.

Now, the USDA is seeking public comments on revisions to its food label policy. The draft version still allows producers to call their products “humane” without providing their animals with treatment that’s better than conventional factory farming. This must be changed.

Please join us in telling Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack that the USDA must take steps to ensure food labels concerning the treatment of farm animals are backed by meaningful animal welfare certifications.


 

 

When it comes to the treatment of farm animals, food products boasting “humanely raised” on their labels may be full of hot air.  Consumers expect a real difference in how animals were raised when they buy products packaged with certain buzzwords, but in truth, no one is policing this form of marketing.

Animals can be raised in crowded, unsanitary conditions with no enrichment or outdoor access—and still, the resulting meat, eggs and milk may be sent to your supermarket bearing terms like "humanely raised" or "raised with care." The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) doesn't define these terms or check up on the actual conditions at the farms.

This is bad for both farm animals and consumers who care about their treatment. It’s also not fair to the many responsible producers who work hard to be certified by legitimate programs dedicated to farm animal welfare.

Now, the USDA is seeking public comments on revisions to its food label policy. The draft version still allows producers to call their products “humane” without providing their animals with treatment that’s better than conventional factory farming. This must be changed.

Please join us in telling Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack that the USDA must take steps to ensure food labels concerning the treatment of farm animals are backed by meaningful animal welfare certifications.

 
 

Update—December 5, 2016:  Thank you to everyone who made their voices heard on this important issue. The USDA comment period is now closed, but please stay tuned for updates! 

When it comes to the treatment of farm animals, food products boasting “humanely raised” on their labels may be full of hot air.  Consumers expect a real difference in how animals were raised when they buy products packaged with certain buzzwords, but in truth, no one is policing this form of marketing.

Animals can be raised in crowded, unsanitary conditions with no enrichment or outdoor access—and still, the resulting meat, eggs and milk may be sent to your supermarket bearing terms like "humanely raised" or "raised with care." The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) doesn't define these terms or check up on the actual conditions at the farms.

This is bad for both farm animals and consumers who care about their treatment. It’s also not fair to the many responsible producers who work hard to be certified by legitimate programs dedicated to farm animal welfare.

Now, the USDA is seeking public comments on revisions to its food label policy. The draft version still allows producers to call their products “humane” without providing their animals with treatment that’s better than conventional factory farming. This must be changed.

Please join us in telling Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack that the USDA must take steps to ensure food labels concerning the treatment of farm animals are backed by meaningful animal welfare certifications.

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