Protect Horses from Torture! Sign the Petition to End Soring

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Protect Horses from Torture! Sign the Petition to End Soring


For decades, a certain segment of the Tennessee Walking Horse industry has been infested with corruption and cruelty. To achieve the high-stepping walk these horses are famous for, some trainers subject horses to the cruel practice of "soring." 
 
To sore horses, trainers smear corrosive chemicals onto the horses’ legs and wrap them in plastic to burn the flesh. Chains strapped to the scalded flesh intensify the anguish. Heavy platform shoes are also used to hide sharp objects piercing the soles of their hooves, which have been intentionally ground down to a sensitive inner layer in order to generate additional pain. The horses fling their legs to avoid the pain, resulting in the desired exaggerated gait.
 
Horse soring has been illegal for over 40 years, but the current enforcement system has failed to protect horses from this cruel practice.
 
Thankfully, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has recently proposed a rule that will crack down on this form of abuse by requiring a stronger inspection system and outlawing much of the soring equipment used by corrupt trainers. The USDA needs to hear that you support this rule and won't tolerate this torture another day.
 

For decades, a certain segment of the Tennessee Walking Horse industry has been infested with corruption and cruelty. To achieve the high-stepping walk these horses are famous for, some trainers subject horses to the cruel practice of "soring." 
 
To sore horses, trainers smear corrosive chemicals onto the horses’ legs and wrap them in plastic to burn the flesh. Chains strapped to the scalded flesh intensify the anguish. Heavy platform shoes are also used to hide sharp objects piercing the soles of their hooves, which have been intentionally ground down to a sensitive inner layer in order to generate additional pain. The horses fling their legs to avoid the pain, resulting in the desired exaggerated gait.
 
Horse soring has been illegal for over 40 years, but the current enforcement system has failed to protect horses from this cruel practice.
 
Thankfully, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has recently proposed a rule that will crack down on this form of abuse by requiring a stronger inspection system and outlawing much of the soring equipment used by corrupt trainers. The USDA needs to hear that you support this rule and won't tolerate this torture another day.
 

Update—January 23, 2017: This rule has been withdrawn as a part of the Trump administration’s government-wide regulatory freeze. As the new administration reviews this and many other pending regulations, the ASPCA will continue to push for it to be finalized. Please stay tuned! To learn more, please visit our News Post on this important rule.

For decades, a certain segment of the Tennessee Walking Horse industry has been infested with corruption and cruelty. To achieve the high-stepping walk these horses are famous for, some trainers subject horses to the cruel practice of "soring." 
 
To sore horses, trainers smear corrosive chemicals onto the horses’ legs and wrap them in plastic to burn the flesh. Chains strapped to the scalded flesh intensify the anguish. Heavy platform shoes are also used to hide sharp objects piercing the soles of their hooves, which have been intentionally ground down to a sensitive inner layer in order to generate additional pain. The horses fling their legs to avoid the pain, resulting in the desired exaggerated gait.
 
Horse soring has been illegal for over 40 years, but the current enforcement system has failed to protect horses from this cruel practice.
 
Thankfully, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has recently proposed a rule that will crack down on this form of abuse by requiring a stronger inspection system and outlawing much of the soring equipment used by corrupt trainers.
 

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